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Menstrual product revolution

Menstrual activism

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Ignorance is Stupid
trinserengel wrote in menstrual_lib
I recently posted a question on Yahoo Answers in the women's health section.  I was asking women what kind of fabric they thought would be best for cloth pads.  I hoping to catch some cloth pad users.

To my surprise (sort of) I got four answers:
  • The first was an incredibly rude comment that I was disgusting and vulgar by even suggesting that women use cloth pads.  This answer made me so angry that I reported it as abuse.
  • Second answer:  "No fabrics are really that good for menstrual pads; however, sheet metal and sandpaper pads are reported to work very well!"
  • Third Answer:  " I don't know about that....not very sanitary...most women would want something they could just dispose of when it comes to that. They use to use cloth menstrual pads in the old days...why go backwards?"
  • Fourth Answer:  "I'd recomend bamboo fiber from trader joe's combined with a light dusting in kosher salt then washing. The salt kills all the viruses and bacteria so you can even re-use them if you don't mind the mess without washing!"  This was the least ignorant and insulting, but I don't think this user knows what she's talking about.
I hate that periods are viewed as dirty and disgusting.  To me they are a part of nature and a sign of fertility.  I mean when you hit menopause, you don't get it any more and you can no longer bear children.

If anyone else her agrees with me, please let me know.



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Its unfortunate that periods are considered "unsanitary" when actually they are a completely natural and healthy function of the female body. Its so strange that the negative connotation of menstruation comes from men and yet is embraced by women everywhere who also consider it to be a disgusting. Have you ever read the book "Cunt"? I suggest you do so if you haven't. There is a whole section on menstruation and alternate ways of controlling it, including a reference section in the back. This is an AMAZING book that every woman should read.

I will be sure to look that up, it sounds interesting.

Cunt is an amazing resource, it made me acutely aware that I was afraid of my own blood. I was a product of male-dominated feminine hygiene industry- made to believe I was dirty and smelly and guilty. There are some other books that should be mentioned: The Curse: Confronting the Last Unmentionable Taboo: Menstruation by Karen Houppert "Houppert says these corporations have created a pervasive "culture of concealment" surrounding menstruation, perpetuated by advertising and single-sex "puberty education" classes in schools"- thats from a summary.

I want to start a social website dedicated to menstruation where women can talk and come together at their awesome time of the month! Kind of like twitter and eventful where it encourages women to meet face to face in their own communities.

check out esty.com for woman homemade rags!

I am not afraid of my blood. I had the good fortune of growing up with a mother who let me see that it was natural and normal. At the age of seven, I knew that a period was what I could expect when I got older. I actually looked forward to it, because to me it was a sign of being a woman. Closer to teen years, around the age of 11, I read a book about a girl from africa who went through a hell of a life, the one highlight, the one good thing in her life that she celebrated was her period, because it meant that she was a woman.

My ma and my sister and me, all used to go sit in the bathroom and talk when she (my ma) was going to be in there for a while. And sometimes she wold be changing her pad or whatever. She would show us the pad with the blood and all and explain to us what it was and why she was bleeding. She told us it was an egg, and then explained to us how babies came about and that egg cells were part of what created babies.

So from a young age I had the realization that menstruation was a sign of fertility, it meant that you could still have babies, and I have never looked down on it.

Now that I make my own pads, I look forward to it even more because I get to try the new ones I've made for myself. I have two daughters and I plan to do to for them what my mom did for me, that way (hopefully) they grow up knowing that it is normal, natural, and even wonderful because it means they can have kids someday too.

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